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King of App

Engelbart, the man of the most brutal demonstration of the computer age

November 1 is the Day of the Dead . For some the day they return from darkness to scare us. For others the day to remember them. And that is where we have stayed. Today we want to remember a man who revolutionized computing. The man who invented one of the essential elements of today. Without Douglas Engelbart , nothing would be the same. We play one daily. In reality, many would not know how to do anything if he. He is used to being white and since relatively recently he has a little wheel in the middle. There are some that are wireless and although the concept of it has not varied excessively, special models have been created in ways that would never have been imagined. Steve Jobs hated him deeply. His creator, Douglas Engelbart , died a little over a year ago but his work, the mouse, has always will accompany. Engelbart was recently inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame. December 9, 1963 is the day that Engelbart presented the mouse to the world in an act that is still remembered today as “the mother of all demonstrations”. That day it can be said that the main technologies of what is now a modern computer were unveiled. At that event, Engelbart also introduced the multi-window system, hypertext, teleconferencing, dynamic file linking, version control, a word processor, and a collaborative real-time editor. Engelbart made the first prototype of a mouse in 1963 with the help of engineer Bill English at the Stanford Research Institute. The design of it in the shape of a mouse by the cable that connected it to the computer turned out to be much more effective to point things on a screen than the other alternatives tested to date such as a joystick or a stylus . Engelbart performed the epic demonstration by sitting in front of a mouse, keyboard, and other controls and projecting the computer screen. Engelbart showed in the first person how a mouse could be used to control a computer by editing text and moving elements. At that time, interaction with a computer was normally done through punched cards. It is not difficult to imagine, then, the stir that the mouse caused among those present. Engelbart’s computer system, which he called “ oN Line System ” (NLS) would later become the basis of the ARPAnet computer network, the original version of what today we know as the Internet. Throughout his life, Engerlbart obtained 21 patents and is considered a true pioneer. For this reason, recently his figure and his work, along with that of 24 other pioneers, have entered the Internet Hall of Fame.

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